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Robert Kiyosaki Network Marketing su.worldventures-review.com Here is my Success University Blog. (Robert Kiyosaki Network Marketing) “Network Marketing” http “Robert Kiyosaki Network Marketing” (Robert Kiyosaki Network Marketing) Rich Dad – Welcome to Rich Dad!It’s become even clearer to me that what Robert talks about and teaches is more important than ever. Financial education is crucial to this country at this Robert Kiyosaki – Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaRobert Toru Kiyosaki (born April 8, 1947) is an investor, businessman, self-help author and motivational speaker. Kiyosaki is best known for his Rich Dad thisRobert Kiyosaki Why the Rich Get RicherBest-selling author Robert Kiyosaki explains why many commonly held truths about managing money are obsolete. In their place, he offers financial so Robert Kiyosaki Why the Rich Get RicherRobert Kiyosaki, author of “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” is an investor, entrepreneur, and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of Register for FREE Rich Dad Workshop | Rich Dad Education Learn Robert Kiyosaki does not participate in these events. The educational training program provided hereunder is not designed or intended John T. Reed’s analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki’s book Rich Dad The US Marine Corps’s official Web site is bragging about Robert Kiyosaki and touting him as an exemplary Marine in spite of the What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money Google Books Resultby Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter
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www.onlineincomereview.biz Robert Toru Kiyosaki (born April 8, 1947) is an investor, businessman, self-help author, motivational speaker and inventor. Kiyosaki is best known for his Rich Dad, Poor Dad series of motivational books and other material. He has written 15 books which have combined sales of over 26 million copies. Although beginning as a self-publisher, he was subsequently published by Warner Books, a division of Hachette Book Group USA, currently his new books appear under the Rich Dad Press imprint. Three of his books, Rich Dad Poor Dad, Rich Dad’s CASHFLOW Quadrant, and Rich Dad’s Guide to Investing, have been on the top 10 best-seller lists simultaneously on The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and the New York Times. The book Rich Kid Smart Kid was published in 2001, with the intent to help parents teach their children financial concepts. He has created three “Cashflow” board and software games for adults and children and has a series of “Rich Dad” audio cassettes and disks. He also publishes a monthly newsletter.

 

Ben Zoma Says: “Who Is Rich?” (A Jew of Faith Explores The Nature of Happiness in His Life)

A Series by Alan D. Busch

Living with Parkinson’s Disease is like taking a ride on a pendulum but with two caveats: first, once you’re on you can’t get off unless you fall off and secondly, while one pendulous swing takes you back to your familiar past the other brings you closer to an uncertain future that begins to look more like today with each morning’s sunrise.

A progressively worsening disease over time, I admit how wrong I was years ago shortly after my doctor diagnosed my Parkinson’s to persist in the folly of denial, trying to fool myself and others that mine was a mild case and would eventually “max out” upon reaching a certain plateau and progress no further.

Well, it never happened and won’t.

The simple truth of the matter is it’s all uphill from here on and at an ever increasing angle of incline. In everyday terms, I feel good less often more frequently.

Now don’t get me wrong. I do have good days when I feel like a “million bucks”. I am neither adopting the “chicken little” approach nor any longer deluding myself that Parkinson’s will not continue to play an important role in my life.

I seek nobody’s pity, but I do want folks to pay attention to my message: there is no weapon more formidable in our psycho-spiritual arsenal than the alliance between old fashioned stubbornness and the power of prayer and devotion. 

On the other hand, the “Parkinsonian” challenges I face every day have strengthened my resolve to live my life as best I can. I learned this approach from my late son Ben Z’L and his grandfather, my dad, Dr. Albert I. Busch, ZT’L both of whom doggedly fought off disease and disability.

As with diabetes management, given proper maintenance and lifestyle, Parkinson’s needn’t prevent me from leading a relatively full life, but I ask readers to remember that the key to living well with Parkinson’s Disease, as with other afflictions, is to live life purposefully.

The fact my body is not functioning properly as it did for so long is, indeed, lamentable, but that fact is never sufficient reason to throw in the towel.

Adopting a vacuous approach, the absence of belief and trust in G-d and the power of prayer or a simple negative approach of feeling sorry for myself would only hasten my demise, leaving me without the support of community, alone and lonely.

Did you ever have a lemonade stand when you were a kid? Do you remember what the old expression advises if you’re ever handed lemons?

Well, what are you waiting for? Get out there and set an example, become an inspiration to others, be able to say at the end of day: “I’ve changed a lot of lives for the better.”

Physical strength is as fleeting as youth itself, especially if unwedded to “the spirituality of purposefulness”. It simply is not enough to lift weights; a better use of your time would be to show folks who need help how to lift the weight of their affliction from their shoulders.

First though, I think it important to understand what we’re dealing with here, of how it feels to pendulate from one extreme to the other while navigating the sometimes perilous waters of Parkinson’s Disease.

Follow these instructions. And yes, you may and should try this at home. Okay, are you ready?

Step 1: Place an empty shoe box on the table in front of you. (If you haven’t a shoe box, any box of similar size will do.) Position it on the table within arms’ reach so that you’ll be able to pick it up when I instruct you to do so.

Step 2: Place your hands in your pockets and do not remove them until I tell you, okay? Now, ready for the third step?

Step 3: Pick up the box. Uh uh, no, no, put your hands back in your pockets. Okay, try it again. Pick up the box.

Step 4: I see you’re having some difficulty. Once again. On the count of three

…1, 2, 3 pick up the box.

Step 5: Are you alright? That wasn’t too bad, was it? Oh, you can remove your hands from your pockets.

You now have a “hands on” slightly hyperbolized understanding of what PD often feels like to me. Equally important is the awareness that symptomology varies among different PD sufferers. On the other hand, we do have some overlapping of disabilities and medications, but far more interesting is Parkinson’s sufferers tend to look alike when our medication levels are low.

It’s the funniest thing. I’ve two friends who have Parkinson’s who bear no resemblance to me whatsoever. Yet there are times when we do look alike.

We shuffle instead of walk, our speech is slurred and we’re unable to raise the volume of our voices. Our posture is stiff and our faces are frozen as if to say: “Please don’t look at me when I’m like this.”

Waiting for medications to kick in can be frustrating. The waiting at times seems interminable. I view it differently by remembering how grateful I’ll feel when my gait normalizes and my hands work again along with many other benefits.

You see? Good things do come to those who wait.

G-d grants each of us a finite number of days and a gift box of our unique strengths, weaknesses, talents, deficiencies and last but not least … free will.

What we do with the contents of our gift boxes is another matter but, as you probably are aware, so much depends upon how each of us uses his free will.

Remember that the next time life makes you grumpy. Take a look at the next fellow’s situation. Now reevaluate your own and repeat after me: “Azayhu ashir?” (Who is rich?) “Hasameach b’chelko.” (He who is happy with his lot.)*

*Chapter 4, Pirkei Avos, (Ethics of Our Fathers)

Alan D. Busch
alandbusch@aol.com
01/08/2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan D. Busch is an independent writer in Skokie, Illinois, married to Kallah and the father of Benjamin, Z’L, Kimberly and Zac. He is currently working on the completion of his second book, a memoir about his late father and enjoys the good fortune of being published in a variety of media in both prose and poetry. His writing is centered upon though not limited to Jewish themes. Reach Alan at alandbusch@aol.com. Please ‘google’ his name for more details or contact him on Facebook. He is the author of Snapshots In Memory of Ben, Water Forest Press, 2007, a contributing author to Everyone’s Got A Story, edited by Ruchama King Feuerman and a community member contributing writer for the Chicago Tribune’s Triblocal.com for Skokie, IL. 

Article from articlesbase.com

Throughout my life, I lived in a world where I saw rich people are getting richer and poor people are burdened to work 9 to 19 hours in a week and had to depends on their retire fund to spend the rest of their life. I remembered clearly when I was about to do my field study, I applied to work in a domestic company. Every single day, I noticed how the employees were working hard just to cover their bills by the end of the moment. Their life was managed by others, by the riches; they need to work throughout their entire life just to earn the measly amount of money provided by their social security (401k). I told myself not to have that kind of life.

Why Retirement Fund Or 401k Kills People?

Mary Painter, Operational Director of CASHFLOW® Technologies, Inc. witnessed how many people died after retiring from their job and some committed suicide. She asked a question that nobody wants to answer, why people died so fast just after retiring or why people would commit suicide after working for their entire life.

The fact is that most of the people work for their entire life; they are working hard just that they would have their retirement fund to depend on when they retire and they found out that the retirement fund was barely enough to cover their expenses every month. They are in a point in their life where they had all the time they need in the world to do whatever they wanted to do, but not having the money to do it.

This is what has happened to the entire baby boom’s generation and generations to come. I said to myself that this kind of situation cannot happen to me; I have to find a way. This kind of situation cannot happen to you also; you have to find a way.

Now, instead of working for my entire life and had to depend on the retirement fund which was not a solution at all, I decided to start my own business and I decided to retire young, retire rich.

How To Retire Young And Retire Rich?

The story above would be a wide description about why 401k won’t work for you. 401k is invested on mutual funds which was too risky. No matter what you professions are, whether you are a banker, a clerk, a secretary, you will face this kind of situation.

How many of you are below 45? Do you want to retire young and retire rich? Or do you want to work your entire life away? How many of you want to be retired around 40 and financially free for the rest of your life?

How many of you are over 45 but are still struggling to cover your bills and debts by the end of the month? And just let your life depends on your 401k which will not be functioning really well if the share price falls?

What exactly is the way or the solution to this problem? What can get you out of the rat race that is faced by 95% of the population? The answer is, are you an employee or an employer? You don’t need to have a large corporation to be called an employer. What matters is your mindset and are you willing to be one.

Your plan to retire using 401k will only work if the value rises which needed the share to rise. So if you want to get out of the rat race and decided to invest in a business, what business model would be the right one to start with at this time of recession? Robert Kiyosaki said, “If I were to rebuild my fortune all over again, I would choose Network Marketing’s Industry”. Why? Because it applied leverage, leverage is the most important thing needed to be rich fast. Imagine Internet as your leverage where 1.4 billion users can see your business and work with you with a single click of the mouse.

The next article will explain more in details about using leverage to retire young, and retire rich. If you wanted to know more about how Network Marketing will greatly help you on achieving financial freedom, you go right now to http://www.makeglobalsales.com

Article from articlesbase.com

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